Networks of Political Possibility ―Post 3.11 Social Movements and Political Activism ―

The Contemporary Japan Group at the Institute of Social
Science (ISS, or Shaken),
University of Tokyo, welcomes you to a lecture by David H. Slater

Networks of Political Possibility
―Post 3.11 Social Movements and Political Activism ―


DATE AND PLACE
Wednesday, November 25 from 6:30-8:00 p.m. at Akamon S
ōgō Kenkyūtō Room 549, Institute of Social Science,
University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus, University of Tokyo


ABSTRACT
In the years since 3.11, we have seen many different
sorts of activism, some of which rise to the level of a
social movement, others not so much. This talk is a
first attempt to identify the characteristics of these
movements, in terms of their institutional connections,
rhetorical focus, performative repertoires and
relations with both mass and social media. We will ask
not only what distinguishes activism today from that
before 3.11, but also how it might allow us to re-think
our understanding of changes in civil society.


SPEAKER
David H. Slater is the Director of the Institute of
Comparative Culture and Professor of Cultural
Anthropology at Sophia University. He is the co-editor
of Social Class in Contemporary Japan, and Japan Copes
with Calamity. Related articles include co-authored
"Social Media, Information and Political Activism in
Japan’s 3.11 Crisis" and "SEALDs (Students Emergency
Action for Liberal Democracy): Research Note on
Contemporary Youth Politics in Japan." He runs the oral
narrative archive "Voices from Tohoku"
(tohokukaranokoe.or) and will be opening "Voices of
Protest Japan" in 2016.


CONTEMPORARY JAPAN GROUP
The ISS Contemporary Japan Group provides
English-speaking residents of the Tokyo area with an
opportunity to hear cutting-edge research in social
science and related policy issues, as well as a venue
for researchers and professionals in or visiting Tokyo
to present and receive knowledgeable feedback on their
latest research projects. Admission is free and advance
registration is not required. Everyone is welcome.

For more information, including maps and a list of past
lectures, please visit our website:
http://web.iss.u-tokyo.ac.jp/cjg/

or contact
Gregory W. NOBLE (noble@iss.u-tokyo.ac.jp)

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